Blog powered by Typepad

« We should just dunk 'Vlad' in the Channel | Main | My baby is home from hospital »

Friday, 06 June 2014

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Such a collossal, sea and airborne military juggernaut had never been seen before - or since!

To be sure David. What with the paratroops, all the auxiliaries and the Mulberries and whatnots but ...

It should be noted that the landing phase of the invasion of Okinawa (186,000 initial assault) was even larger than that of Normandy (156,000 initial assault).

The size of this self-sustained fleet was vastly greater than that which accompanied the Normandy bound flotilla and had to sail thousands of miles from its bases.

American & British Fleet units:
• Fast Carrier Force (TF 58) under Vice Admiral Marc A. Mitscher with 88 ships (including 11 fleet carriers, 6 light carriers, 7 battleships and 18 cruisers);[11]
• British Carrier Force (TF 57) under Vice Admiral Sir Bernard Rawlings with 4 carriers, 2 battleships, 5 cruisers, 14 destroyers and fleet train;[11]
• Gunfire and Covering Support Group (TF 54) under Rear Admiral Morton L. Deyo with 10 old battleships, 11 cruisers and 30 destroyers.[12]
• Task Force 51 (TF 51; also Joint Expeditionary Force) under Vice Admiral Richmond K. Turner (who was holding position of Commander, Amphibious Forces, Pacific):[13]
• Amphibious Support Force (TF 52) under Rear Admiral William H. P. Blandy[13]
• TG 52.1: 18 escort carriers with 450 aircraft;[13]
• Sl Escort Carrier Group: 4 escort carriers with Marine Aircraft Group 31 and 33;[13]
• Mine Flotilla (TG 52.2)
• Underwater Demolition Flotilla (TG 52.11): ten 100-men UDT aboard destroyer escorts[13]
• 170 fire support landing craft
• Western Islands Attack Group (TG 51.1) under Rear Admiral Ingolf N. Kiland with 77th Infantry Division, 17 attack and attack cargo transporters, 56 LSTs and support vessels;[13]
• Northern Attack Force (TF 53) under Rear Admiral Lawrence F. Reifsnider, Commander Amphibious Group 4, aboard USS Panamint (AGC-13) with III Amphibious Corps (Major General Roy Geiger) on 40+ attack and attack cargo transporters, 67 LSTs and support vessels;[13]
• Southern Attack Force (TF 55) under Rear Admiral John L. Hall with XXIV Corps (Major General John R. Hodge);[13]
• Demonstration Group (TF 51.2) with 2nd Marine Division;[13]
• Expeditionary Troops (TF 56) under Lieutenant General Simon Bolivar Buckner, Jr. with Tenth Army.[13]

Should've added - that above came from a comment to a post rather focused on Normandy. Might enjoy this Cpl Duff.

http://smallwarsjournal.com/jrnl/art/good-vibrations

The most momentous decision taken by the Western Allies was sadly at Munich in 1938, when Chamberlain and Daladier failed to call Hitler's bluff and handed him a diplomatic triumph - thereby putting the kibosh on the most broad-based and promising coup plot (plus a secret assassination plot known only to the committed hard core) ever devised by his internal enemies in the Wehrmacht.

Just look at the size of TF57!

Off topic. I have finished that novel you recommended Mr Duff. A really good yarn and good value at £3.57!

I'd say more but the thunder is [actual thunder] is nearing. By the nature of how "we" network I must drop offline

http://formerspook.blogspot.com/2014/06/the-man-who-won-war-for-us.html

dont forget stalingrad

Well yes right Mr. Malpas Sir (and seeing how Duff's out with a bad case of electronic Shiver Me Timbers) we'll just have to make do with a dip into the Archives:

http://duffandnonsense.typepad.com/duff_nonsense/2014/02/an-historical-exercise.html

What's that John, asked for Stalingrad and the Archive-Keeper misses GPS precision? Well Sir, at least I've landed you on the Eastern Front!

And of course we should remember there was an equally decisive battle fought on the Eastern Front at the same time.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Bagration

Sorry, struggling with finding my way round this new layout on my computer I have rather lost track of this conversation.

Thanks for the info, JK, and indeed, the size of TF57 is mortifying when one sees how the Royal Navy has shrunk since then.

BOE, glad you enjoyed the yarn - an A1 corker, in my view. I guess from the price you bought it for your Apple-thingie. By the way, did you notice that the deadly, and dead cunning, killer in the secondary story-line was not captured or killed - so look out for book two!

The comments to this entry are closed.