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Tuesday, 30 July 2013

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It's customary to write academic posts/titles with a capital. If you didn't you'd get endless confusion when you refer to a Reader, or remark that a Professor is a good lecturer. The Yanks don't have "Reader" or "Lecturer" amongst the ranks of their tenured academics, as far as I know, but even for their "professor" who is just a piano teacher I'm confident that they'd use Professor. It's much as one would use for Sergeant, Captain, Lieutenant Colonel, Rear Vice Admiral, and whatnot.

Not that I'd acquit that mutton-head on this argument.

Thank you, DM, succinct and to the point, as always.

"When that museum was captured by Israeli paratroopers and renamed the “Rockefeller Museum,” the scrolls were moved to the Shrine of the Book."

"Moved"? "Moved?" Thank God they weren't looted or stolen.

Quite so, DM, but if we had found a copy of, say, Magna Carta somewhere in France we would have 'moved' it rather sharpish!

Also, to add a slight, very slight, whiff of humbug, the Israelis are hell bent on recovering as much of what was looted from them in Europe in the '30s/'40s as they can.

Well, by and large, winners write the history - and the laws of possession.

Actually DM we do have "Lecturer" in our lexicon - it's as Duffers often explains "Our common language is the problem."

Our "Lecturers" are generally called "Elected Officials, (usually Democrats)".

Quite so, DM, but if we had found a copy of, say, Magna Carta somewhere in France we would have 'moved' it rather sharpish!

Well David, man your Fleet - there's an "original copy" in Washington DC!

http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/26142

I would 'man my fleet' if we had a fleet!

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