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Tuesday, 19 April 2016

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http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/41089

http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/39647

(And WW, for you, there's an entry on that "Wiltshire dig" you mentioned in a comment I noted recently you left somewhere - near the latest entry - just *do the clickie* on the title page to bring up the most current entries.)

And David, a picture with which you might impress the ladies of Croscombe. My advice? Enlarge it.

(Better yet - ask if "There a member of the audience wish to join me at the lectern and Blow it up?! )

http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/533

David, JKs advice for a show and tell piece in your talk before the ladies is spot on. That "item" just proves that the drive for sex is timeless and young men have always found a good excuse to do so, even in Shakespeare's day. You might say "where there's a Will there's a way". The ladies will no doubt laugh.

JK thanks for that link to the Wiltshire dig. Quite interesting. There were four comments following it and I recognized one name "Dearime". Another comment mentioned a story about an Iron Age site in Somerset of all places! Imagine an ancient site like that just under Duff manor.

Personally, I would not be caught dead wearing "pink ribbon". My standards are pretty low, not desperate.

Thanks for the links, JK.

Whiters, if pink isn't your style you could always try a tartan ribbon.

"Thanks for the links JK" yeah right. Easy to assay your actually reading David.

First fr'instance (of at least three).

No question for either me or Whitewall

"[T]he Spuds McKenzie title of Master of the Revels?"

The ladies of Croscombe will not be amused.

JK, until now I had never heard of Spuds McKenzie but I assume it refers to some dog who took part in a TV ad. 'The Master of the Revels', of course, ran London's theatres - with an iron rod! - in Shakespeare's days. I can assure you that the ladies of Croscombe were very amused, particularly with the idea of pink ribbons!

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